Quimper Family Telemedicine

Quimper Family Medicine is open and half or more visits have gone to telemedicine.

People are staying home, and hooray for that, many thanks to everyone who is trying to protect themselves and others. We have seen our patient numbers drop by more than half. We have intensified cleaning and discuss whether a clinic visit needs to be in person or can be via telemedicine. I am using VSee, Zoom and in a pinch, Messenger. At the same time I am still seeing some patients in person. We are extending refills, putting off labs, trying to walk the tricky balance of sharing decisions for each particular person.

Many thanks to everyone who is working with us. I am deeply thankful for all the people who are staying home and also for the people working in the grocery stores, supplies, garbage, electricity and medicine. Thanks to the Health Department and to the University of Washington lab and to Jefferson Healthcare’s Covid-19 testing. Thanks for the stimulus package that just passed and I hope will help everyone.

The photograph is Mount Baker on a hike with my daughter. It’s not in sharp focus, just like what will happen in the next week or two is not in focus.

Be careful out there.

birds, beauty, brains

Three happy things today: Birds!

Not a great photograph, right? I like it, partly because it was such a challenge. Still on the big island of Hawaii, we spot two very small birds building a nest. I am zoomed all the way in and holding the camera up to catch a glimpse when one flies in. They are very quick and there is lots of greenery in the way!

I am happy about brains. No, I am not a zombie, I don’t eat them, I just like that my work engages my mind. I learn new things daily from patients, from specialists, from looking up engaging questions! Medicine is changing continuously and I am grateful to be part of it.  (Ok, I am not grateful that insurance companies are increasing prior authorization exponentially.)

I am happy about beauty. Here is another glimpse of our small nest builders and we think we’ve identified them.

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I think that this is a common waxbill, also not a native bird. Either that or a black-rumped waxbill but neither of us got a good shot of the back. Hooray for spring and nests.