Vaccination talk

My cousin asks me once, why do doctors say, “This will only hurt a little?’ when they give a shot.

I thought about it. “It’s a matter of scale. Picture this: in room one, I have a woman who thinks her lung cancer is back and it is. In room two I have a mother and daughter crying because the daughter is pregnant and frightened. In room three, I have a well adult who needs a vaccination. Scale their levels of pain.”

Room one is very high, room two is very high, room three barely registers on my pain scale.

I would give out a health department vaccination information booklet by 24 weeks to my pregnant patients, especially the first pregnancy. I previously had given it later, but then I had a woman who refused the child’s vaccines at visit after visit after visit, saying that they were still doing research. The child still had no vaccinations at 9 months.

Remember the woman who refused vaccinations for her children? She had more than four children. They all got whooping cough, pertussis. They whooped for months and were on quarantine. They were not allowed out of the household, any of them, until they were no longer infectious. The mother said she now was for vaccines and got them vaccinated.

I have seen adults with pertussis. Adults do not whoop but they cough. They can cough until they throw up or until they break a rib. For months. It is not fun at all. The adult Tdap stands for tetnus, diptheria, and acellular pertussis. I have never seen a case of diptheria and I don’t want to. It sounds horrible and can kill.

Have I seen a complication of a vaccination? One in 30 years of practice. And I know a person who had a complication, but they were not my patient.

The illnesses cause way more damage and disability than the vaccine. In residency I care for a young man in a group home. He can’t talk and has an odd skull shape. His mother got measles during the pregnancy. Measles is one of the infections that can cause severe birth defects. Get vaccinated before getting pregnant, though half the pregnancies in the US are “unintended”. That usually means “unbirthcontrolled”. I do not really understand that, since the risk of pregnancy in a fertile woman is one in four every time. Twenty five percent seems a pretty high risk to me.

I’ve written about my response to my last Covid-19 vaccination. It’s not a complication. It is an antibody response and it means that my immune system is WORKING, though admittedly it is weird and annoying. I don’t like the muscle dysfunction, but I will get the vaccinations anyhow.

I have a very alternative young woman in for prenatal care once. I give her the vaccination booklet. “Oh, my child is getting every vaccine there is,” she says.

“May I ask why? I was not expecting you to say that.”

“I was in the Peace Corps in Africa. I have seen kids die from every single one of the diseases we vaccinate for. My kid will get ALL the vaccinations.”

I said, “Please would you talk to my other moms?”

She smiled at that. “Maybe.”

I hope she did and does.

5 thoughts on “Vaccination talk

  1. Lou Carreras says:

    I once had an infection on my eyelid, and there was a fear that injecting an anesthetic might spread the infection. So they decided to operate without anesthesia. The surgeon was honest- “this is going to hurt like blue blazes.” Ever since then I’ve had a real scale for pain.

  2. I am a big believer in vaccinations. I remember watching my niece, eighteen months old at the time, gasping for breath, in an oxygen tank. She had whooping cough. Thankfully she lived, but it could have gone the other way.

  3. I hope she does, too.

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